TOS Sweet Critique: Zane Education

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WHAT:  Zane Education

COST:  Free {for demo versions of the videos}, $8.99/month {all videos in one subject}, $12.99/month {all videos in a grade}, $17.99/month {all videos}; yearly pricing available as well

RECOMMENDED AGES:  Kindergarten to adult

CONTACT

WHAT IS ZANE EDUCATION?

Zane Education is a site dedicated to providing subtitled videos on a variety of subjects.

The site has thousands of videos for hundreds of subjects such as music, art, history, and science.

Zane uses what they call The Missing Piece ©, which is the use of subtitles in the videos to enhance understand and learning.

In addition to the subtitled videos, Zane provides quizzes, encyclopedias, dictionaries, lesson plans, and more to enhance the material.

OUR THOUGHTS

We’re a big fan of educational videos in our house.  Babydoll enjoys watching them, and I love knowing that she’s learning at the same time.

I also think they do a great job of driving home a concept or new material.

Zane has taken this concept a step further with their subtitles, and there’s one key aspect of this I love:  the direction on how to use them.

The idea of having your child watch and listen, then just watch {and read the subtitles, without sound}, and then teach it back to you is genius!

I would think this could be a great thing for a reluctant learner, as it would be more fun than a traditional report.

Also, it gives children practice with public speaking, presentations, and more.  Good stuff!

I appreciate the lesson plans and quizzes, although we really wouldn’t make much use of those.  Videos are more for learning enhancement in our house, as opposed to the actual lesson.

For many homeschoolers, though, this complete solution would be great; you have everything you need to cover an entire subject there in Zane.

I’d like to point out one thing: I probably wouldn’t let my child have at these videos without supervision.  For instance, there is a “Health and Sex Education” section that I wouldn’t want my nine year old to stumble upon.

I understand the reasoning behind having it there, but that’s something I wouldn’t want anyone else covering with my child.  If you control the videos watched, it won’t be a problem.

WHAT OTHERS THOUGHT

Find out what other members of the Crew thought about Zane Education by clicking the banner below!

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True Confessions:  I was provided with a Gold membership to Zane Education to facilitate my review.  All opinions are my own.

This is my last TOS Crew review.  While I have enjoyed my time on the Crew, it is time for me to step down and focus on other things in my life that need attention right now.  I am grateful for all the wonderful opportunities the Crew has provided me with, and perhaps some day, if they’ll have me, I can return.

 

Let Me Tell You ‘Bout the Birds and the Bees #KotexMom

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No, not quite that talk.  But really, this talk eventually leads to that talk.

If you have a daughter, you’ll have this talk.

At some point, in some fashion, you’ll have this talk.

It may be in-depth and comfortable, or it may be short and awkward.

Yes, I’m talking about the period talk.

I feel fairly comfortable with my daughter, and we do discuss pretty much anything under the sun.

Even still, I still feel that twinge of “Oh crap!” whenever I think about having this discussion with her.

How do we make it easier?  Here are three tips to help ease you into the discussion.

KNOW YOUR STUFF

Have you ever had to give a presentation?  Wasn’t it much easier to do when you were properly prepared?

This talk with your daughter is no different.  If it’s difficult for you to discuss this with her {and really, even if it’s not}, educate yourself.

Know the facts surrounding first periods, know what changes will be happening to your daughters body, and most importantly {in my opinion} know the difference between myth and fact.

It amazes me the number of parents that never question information they were given or have heard and then pass that on to their children.

Set your daughter up for success; educate yourself so you can prepare her for all possibilities and situations.

CHOOSE A DAY TO HAVE “THE TALK”

Maybe it’s just me, but unless I pick a specific day for something, it usually doesn’t happen.

Then there’s the uncomfortable nature of this conversation, and well, it would probably never occur if I didn’t pick a date.

U by Kotex Tween has this awesome calendar online that helps you prepare for the talk by not only picking a date, but by also giving you steps to take to prepare:

I love, love, love this thing!  You just choose your day and it gives you tasks to complete on the days leading up to the talk.

It covers facts you should know, questions she might ask, tips on starting the conversation, and more.  It’ll even send you a reminder via email.

BE PREPARED

I don’t mean for the talk.  We’ve discussed that already.

I mean be prepared for her first period.  I think we get so caught up in the talk that we don’t think about the logistics sometimes.

She’ll need sanitary items.  I love that Kotex has has designed U by Kotex Tween products, just for tweens.

Remember having to keep those giant, thick pads in your purse?  Remember the distinct {ugly} baby pink wrappers?

Our daughters don’t have to deal with products not designed for them and their bodies.  These things are stylish!

Now, before you think I’m crazy, hear me out.  If you have to use the stuff, shouldn’t it be cute?  I think so.

FINAL THOUGHTS

I’m still not entirely comfortable about this conversation.  I don’t think I ever will be.  I do think that I’m much better prepared to have it now, though.

I think it’s important as a parent to have these conversations, the uncomfortable ones, because most of the time, they’re the most important.

I’d rather have this experience and know my daughter is prepared than to not do it because I’m uncomfortable.

My job is to set her up for life, and this is a part of life.

We haven’t just had one talk, we’ve had several small talks.  It’s by no means done, but I think as you let things happen naturally, it is a bit better.

If she doesn’t bring it up, bring it up on your own, in subtle ways.

Have you had this talk with your daughter? Do you have any tips to share?

True Confessions:  I wrote this review while participating in a Brand Ambassador Campaign by Mom Central Consulting on behalf of U by Kotex Tween and received products to facilitate my post and a promotional item to thank me for taking the time to participate.

 

Campaign Photography with Sears Grilling: Food on the Grill! #GrillingisHappiness #SoFabU

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This week’s course work focused on photographing food cooking on the grill.

lot of technical knowledge was discussed {ISO, aperture, shutter speed} and a lot of different angles were discussed {tilt, diagonal, from above}.

This was probably the hardest week yet, for several reasons.  Generally speaking, when you’re cooking, you’re not thinking about taking pictures.

With the help of my wonderful husband, though, I was able to snap a few {or 140+} pictures.

One thing I’d like to note before moving forward:  infrared grills cook fast.  Like, super-fast.  They get to 700 degrees…

This means there is a lot of smoke.  This means that it can be difficult to get good pictures, at least for those of us who are inexperienced.

Despite the lack of good pictures for our burgers, they were the juiciest burgers ever.  Ever.

Loving our new grill!

Hot dogs were first.  I love a good hot dog.  And, we tried spiral cutting some of the dogs.

See?  Really, really hot!

Love this picture!  A few weeks ago I wouldn’t have been able to get a shot this close and have it be so crisp!

Yummy, burgers!

This isn’t a technically “sound” picture, but I just had to show you the smoke.  And this wasn’t even the worst of it!

Finally, we had Asian BBQ chicken.  Yummy!

I have to point out that my lovely husband de-boned these after I accidentally bought bone-in chicken.

In addition to the excitement of using our new grill, I had a great week spending more time with Vince.  We’re both learning together:  I’m learning how to grill and he’s learning how to use the new grill.

Totally awesome.

True Confessions:  I am a member of the Collective Bias™ Social Fabric® Community. This shop has been compensated as part of a social shopper insights study for Collective Bias™ and Sears #CBias #GrillingIsHappiness. All photos and opinions are my own.

Homeschool Pinterest Finds

Pinterest.  ‘Nough said.

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I haven’t been a great pin-er, but I spent some time on Pinterest tonight and remembered why I try to stay away:  it’s like heroine.  Man, that thing can suck you in and never let you go…  Oh, but I love it.  It’s so full of win.

And while product reviews and giving away awesome stuff to you guys is superb and all, I was missing my personal time with ya so I found a few pins that I wanted to share.  From me to you, no giveaways, no review stuff, just awesome homeschool stuff:

  • My Plant Observation Book – We’ve been learning plant parts and just planted a bean seed, so this will come in very handy!
  • Journal Pages – This is seriously one of the best things ever.  Really man.  Awesome.  At first I thought it would be awesome to do one of these everyday with Babydoll.  Then I realized what a tremendously bad idea that was and decided on once a week.
  • Contraction Cupcakes – Have to find some appropriate cupcake clip art and then I’m going to town making these!

Homeschool Encouragement

Getting deep and emotional!

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If Homeschool Walls Could TalkWe are entering our third year of homeschooling.  Since I never thought I’d be doing this, I’m pretty amazed that we’re still trucking along.

Amazed, and yet, I feel like I totally suck at it.

I know homeschoolers go through phases where they worry they’re not doing enough for their children and similar feelings, so I know I’m not alone.

But, this is called If Homeschool Walls Could Talk, which implies some sort of secret, at least in my mind.  So, I’m going to just lay it all out there for you guys to see…

Our first year of homeschooling ended with us barely finishing half of the year’s work.  Yep, there, I said it.

That’s right.  We had all of our nifty stuff from our boxed curriculum company {that I loved by the way}, and I only managed to teach a tiny smidgen of what was there.

And no, it wasn’t because we were using other stuff.  We simply didn’t do school.  Here I was, the homeschooling mom of a second grader, and I wasn’t teaching her…

To this day I feel like a complete noob about that.  But I at least had some fairly unusual circumstances to attribute my noobdom to.

We had moved out of our house in WA, were living with Grandma in OR for three months while Vince exited the Navy and found a job, to then move from OR to AL at the end of October.  From November {when we arrived in AL, no place to live, no friends or family} through January we lived in a hotel one hour from Vince’s work and almost two hours from the area we’d eventually be moving to.

We spent those three months looking at houses {yes, that meant driving those couple of hours one way to look at houses, many, many, many days…}, finding our way around, learning and complying with the new state’s homeschool laws, trying to make ends meet while we waited for the new paycheck to come in {and while unemployment was no longer coming in}, and dealing with all sorts of other little things that occur when you’re living with a small portion of your things {while everything else is in storage} in a hotel room and trying to generate a new normal.

I’m not gonna lie, I hated living in that hotel.  Looking back, I was probably being an ungrateful whiny thing, but I still hated it nonetheless.  And it was expensive.  Like $1,400 a month expensive…

The hotel wasn’t a bad place; an extended stay type of thing with a little kitchenette, new and fairly clean.  My husband was fortunate enough to find a good job at a time when most people couldn’t get hired.  We had finally been preapproved for a loan and ended up finding a great house.  I was healthy, my family was healthy, I really should have been grateful.

Hotel roomBut, I hated living in that hotel.  As it dragged on through November, and then December, and into January, it’s all I could do to sit there in what was fast becoming a cramped hotel room and homeschool Babydoll.

I didn’t want to.  Or, the day would be spent running errands or doing something out of town and then when we got back I didn’t want to.

Looking back, I’m honestly not sure we got much of anything done.  We started strong at the beginning of the year while at Grandma’s house, but we quickly trickled once we were in AL.

HouseThen it was finally time to move into our new house!  We were excited!  I was ecstatic!  I thought, “Now I can finally settle into a routine!!!”

Well, then we had to wait four weeks for our things to come out of storage and make it to us.  And then there was a problem with the fridge delivery.

Want to know what’s almost harder than living in an extended stay?  Living in a house without a fridge, pots or pans, utensils, plates, cups, chairs, tables, beds, pillows, linens…  You get the picture.

So, to get us through that month we had to go and buy stuff, even though I knew I had stuff coming.  It was winter and it was cold {snow in AL that winter, crazy!} and there were no blinds or curtains on my many windows to keep the cold out and the heat in.

I should note, however, that despite all this, I was still infinitely more happy in my house.  It felt like things were finally moving forward.

Great, we can finally “do school.”

Nope.  Now comes time to talk on the phone for endless hours with delivery folks and military movers and the blinds lady and the fridge people and the utility companies and this person and that person.

HouseAnd then our stuff came!!!  Which meant things had to be unpacked and put away.

It was Spring before we really started doing any semblance of school again.  I felt so bad.  So, so, so bad, like I was letting Babydoll down.

She was fine, for the record.  She enjoyed driving across the country and seeing the Grand Canyon and Arizona and all sorts of other awesome stuff.  She enjoyed the new “castle park” we had found near the hotel.  She enjoyed living close enough to family to drive eight hours and surprise them all in December.  She enjoyed seeing all sorts of new things and hearing all sorts of new things and experiencing all sorts of new things.  She enjoyed being my helper.  She enjoyed our new house and the pond out back and fishing in it.

We ended the school year in June, because despite the fact that I had a ton of “not school” time, I felt like I needed a break.  I felt like I just needed to start new next year.

I cried.  I’m crying right now writing this.  I don’t know that I’ll ever be able to let go of the feelings of failure and of letting Babydoll down.  I felt like I let the homeschooling community as a whole down by not “doing school” properly.  I felt like the ultimate billboard for reasons not to homeschool your child.

Yet, we kept at it for a second year.  It was much better.  We were much more settled and got much more done.  Yet we still didn’t “finish” everything.

And then I realized, you never finish.  You’re always going, always learning.  It doesn’t stop.  Just because an entire book hasn’t been completed doesn’t mean we aren’t doing things right.

Just because she didn’t learn every last multiplication fact in third grade doesn’t mean that in the end she will have still learned all the math she needs to know.

It’ll all be alright.  She’s progressing and flourishing and enjoying what I hope to be a fulfilling and exciting life.  As our one and only child {by choice}, I constantly worry that I’m not giving her everything she needs.  I’m hoping she’ll grow up thinking that she had awesome parents and an awesome life.

So, if my homeschool walls could talk, they’d tell you of the struggle we’ve had adapting my preconceived notions of what it means to learn and school to what homeschooling is really about:  living a life of learning and loving it.

If my homeschool walls could talk, they’d tell you that I still worry about what I’m doing daily, hourly sometimes.  They’d tell you that I cry sometimes thinking I’m not doing enough for Babydoll.  They’d tell you that I want more than anything for her to grow up and think she lucked out on the home front.

They’d tell you that we’re plugging away, for a third year, learning from our mistakes and what didn’t work and figuring out what works for us.

They’d tell you that I love my daughter more than just about anything and want her to grow up thinking that homeschooling was the most wicked awesome thing we could have done.

This post was written as part of a link up with some other fabulous homeschool moms.  We’re all really laying it out there for the world to see, so be sure to stop by each one and give them some encouragement and love.

Lisa at The Army Chap’s Wife

Megan at Half-Pint House

Maureen at Spell Outloud

Reesa at Suburban Tree Hugger

Laura at Day by Day in Our World

Jasmine at Ponder the Path

Lee at Homeschool Canada

Jimmie at Jimmie’s Collage

Honey at Sunflower Schoolhouse

Tiffany at Sweet Phenomena

Want to share what your homeschool walls would say?  Link up here!